all 14 comments

[–]you_may_die[S] 3 points4 points ago

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so I didn't read a whole lot in 2016 by the numbers, I think the entire list of long works is as follows:

chimamanda ngozi adichie - americanah

junot diaz - the brief wondrous life of oscar wao

william blum - killing hope

william gibson - neuromancer

(as well as a ton of comic books/graphic novels)

and while I think oscar wao was my favourite i spent most of the year working on killing hope, which was recommended by /u/neku (thanks!) when i posted a thread here asking about books on 20th century US foreign policy in south america. it's a very dense book that details american military/cia interventions all over the world post WWII, from south america to the middle east to africa and even europe. i'm not a military buff, though; i wanted to learn about history from a critical perspective and that was exactly what this book did. spoiler alert: the US has been the biggest enemy of democracy in the world for the better part of the last century. anyway it was hard to get through and took a lot of nights of dozing off while reading but i'm really glad I read it and it'l always have a special place on my bookshelf.

[–]FZA 2 points3 points ago

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oscar wao is a fun read. i dont think it's the best or anything but its a good palette cleanser and its a popular book so you can talk about it to people and they'll dig. im glad you liked it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

[–]oolong 1 point2 points ago

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i bought americanah last year but i still haven't read it. i really liked purple hibiscus though

[–]you_may_die[S] 1 point2 points ago

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it's the only one i've read by her, i'm not 100% on the usage of this term but i think it's a bildungsroman? it's rad

[–]FZA 3 points4 points ago

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im reading alejandra pizarnik rn. her only collected works is in spanish so its great practice but slow going. im not sharing any translations because theyre super bad but she's cool kinda like rimbaud. super sad like all her poems are about mental illness or suicide which is also raw and real.

[–]mustbecurious 3 points4 points ago

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i'm struggling on the third (and final, i hope) act of fingersmith because i find it too dragging. the shift between the first and second acts sounds like two different books entirely. i'm not sure how i feel about it, cause i really like how the first act ended but the second one was really disappointing??? i'm not looking forward to the third, to be honest.

when fingersmith gets tedious, i shift to uprooted, which is like a fairytale retelling or something (i'm still in the first few chapters). maybe jumping the man who mistook his wife for a hat when i finish with uprooted, because it's been recommended to me since forever and i am a terrible friend. (non-fiction books tend to make not want to read so idk)

favourite thing i read in 2016 was a fanfic lmao Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities, which is actually a re-read for my thesis but hey (it's either this or fanfic).

[–]captain_cornflakes 3 points4 points ago

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i've been reading lionel terray's conquistadors of the useless on and off, it's an autobiography focused on his mountaineering career.

books finished recently:

i flew through max leonard's lanterne rouge: the last man in the tour de france after getting it as a gift on christmas. it's a collection of stories about various lanternes rouge, the rider placed last in the general classification of the tour de france, and has some fascinating stories of the politics and bizarre events at the back of the peloton.

another cycling book i finished up semi-recently was mark cavendish's autobiography at speed: my life in the fast lane. if you're looking for an account of how modern pro teams operate & what it's like to be one of the greatest sprinters cycling has ever seen, read this book.

[–]captain_cornflakes 2 points3 points ago

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on the topic of cycling books, the best one i've read is tim krabbé's the rider. while the book is fiction, it's steeped in the traditions and superstition of road cycling like no other.

[–]you_may_die[S] 1 point2 points ago

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that's really cool, I'm guessing you are a bigtime cyclist? i'm a casual one myself, i walk to work so i'm not even a bike commuter but when it's nice out i ride just about everywhere else. i might stick the rider on my goodreads because that sounds pretty cool

[–]captain_cornflakes 2 points3 points ago

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idk if i'd call myself a /big-time/ cyclist, i try to get out when i can & i do follow the worldtour races but i'm not exactly at racing form even in the summer.

[–]WorshipNoodles 2 points3 points ago

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I mostly read YA fantasy/sci-fi these days, last two books were Of Fire And Stars and The Rift Uprising.

[–]oakreef 2 points3 points ago

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I read the first Avatar Legend of Aang/Last Airbender comic (the Promise). It's good and it deals with a lot of things I thought were really cool to do in a kid's comic. It deals with the struggles of coming to peaceful solution to the problem of a colonial power that has set up colonies that now contain people of both nations both of which feel it is their home (*cough northern ireland cough*) and there's a part where Aang loses his shit over cultural appropriation and and another where he tells Roku to go fuck himself over humanism.

I also read another story from Dubliners and frankly I don't really get these.

[–]Detective 2 points3 points ago

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way late on this but John Womack Jr.'s zapata and the mexican revolution is proving an exciting read so far. it is a recounting of popular attitudes in Zapata's home province before and I think through the Revolution. the author admits it's not a class or materialist analysis but of course there has been plenty about class and the economic conditions for the campesinos

[–]you_may_die[S] 1 point2 points ago

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actually you're not late at all you're just very early for today's thread which I am writing now