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[–]StudentRadical 12 points13 points ago

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The reason for this that I've heard of - I have no expertise in linguistics, second language acquisition - is that Japanese can't be translated sentence by sentence without it resulting in a lot of gibberish due to some pronoun system thing or sumthing.

Duolingo is mostly fine for grammar, vocabulary, translation practice and sentence analysis. But to actually become conversant in a language needs lots of talking that preferably occurs over things you actually have a communicative need about, a lot of input by reading and listening in variety of registers and contexts and so on. I personally have seen much success, taking cue from that 'communicative need' criterion', by playing enormous amount of date simulators and needless to say it has also made me completely irresistible.

[–]devtesla[S] 6 points7 points ago

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A+ posting

[–]you_may_die 5 points6 points ago

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so once I'm done french on duolingo i'm gonna have to read books in french

[–]StudentRadical 5 points6 points ago

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Read/listen/talk now. Like 1/3-1/4 of study time on Duolingo and the rest is something else, which you might rotate. You might read simple news in French, or find some webcomic or print a Wikipedia article on something you like and already know about or learn a song, that's a fun way to practice pronounciation.