all 25 comments

[–]oolong🍵>🍔 5 points6 points ago

ochazuke, chagayu, scallion pancakes, festival, soy milk, nian gao, dubu jorim, matang, kimchi jjigae, tofu pudding, winter melon soup

stopping here, but this a really exciting project!! let me know if you want any help with the kimchi-making process!!!

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

ochazuke

I don't get it, a lot of nouns that I don't recognize in descriptions of it. It looks like it's something that looks delectable in anime.

chagayu

A new way to make porridge sounds exciting to me! I'm definitely most interested in little things like this instead of gourmet affairs.

scallion pancakes

These look cute!

festival

What are these like? I have no frame of reference for these.

soy milk

Pass.

nian gao

The google images search results for this confuse me greatly.

dubu jorim

It looks beautiful ;_;

matang

I was a skeptic at first since sweet potatoes are somewhat exotic here.

kimchi jjigae

tofu pudding

I'm interested, I think it would be lovely with fresh berries! Please give me recipes and subscribe me to your mailing list.

winter melon soup

Pass, I've never seen a winter melon here.

stopping here, but this a really exciting project!! let me know if you want any help with the kimchi-making process!!!

Oh definitely, it seems like it would be prudent to start making kimchi early on in the process! I'm a big fan of sauerkraut and cabbage in general. How well does kimchi keep in the refrigerator?

[–]oolong🍵>🍔 1 point2 points ago

ochazuke I don't get it, a lot of nouns that I don't recognize in descriptions of it. It looks like it's something that looks delectable in anime.

it's pretty cheap and easy to make if you have a pantry full of japanese essentials, which uh, is why mentions in anime are limited to characters who are poor or lazy. the simplest version is storebought furikake, rice and tea. moving a step up would be grilled/fried/baked salmon, rice, roasted sesame seeds, seaweed and tea. there are lots of variations though

festival What are these like? I have no frame of reference for these.

so, it's like a biscuit but fried??? the dough is hardy(neither tender nor flaky) though, and it has a bit of cornmeal too. if not this, i would've recommended bammy or johnny cakes

nian gao The google images search results for this confuse me greatly.

whoops, there are two dishes with this name, but i meant the cny one.this recipe is close to what my mom does, but it's basically a sweet, chewy, sticky rice cake that you can then panfry for max deliciousness

tofu pudding I'm interested, I think it would be lovely with fresh berries! Please give me recipes and subscribe me to your mailing list.

oh no, the tofu pudding i meant was douhua, not the one that goes with berries. uhhh, douhua is more a 'make-your-own-soy-milk-then-make-a-dessert' recipe, but you've passed on soy milk so just ignore this one???

Oh definitely, it seems like it would be prudent to start making kimchi early on in the process! I'm a big fan of sauerkraut and cabbage in general. How well does kimchi keep in the refrigerator?

kimchi can last indefinitely in the fridge as long as you keep it under the liquid line and stir it around every once in a while. it's lactobacteria, but the sourness is desirable here so the worse that happens is you introduce different bacteria and end up growing mold

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

it's pretty cheap and easy to make if you have a pantry full of japanese essentials, which uh, is why mentions in anime are limited to characters who are poor or lazy. the simplest version is storebought furikake, rice and tea. moving a step up would be grilled/fried/baked salmon, rice, roasted sesame seeds, seaweed and tea. there are lots of variations though

Making bachelor foods of other countries is definitely appealing to me! The local equivalent is probably eating some gross microwave pizza, so the Japanese are totally leading us on that department.

so, it's like a biscuit but fried??? the dough is hardy(neither tender nor flaky) though, and it has a bit of cornmeal too. if not this, i would've recommended bammy or johnny cakes

I haven't had luck finding corn meal here, last time I searched for making corn tortillas I failed. Actually it seems that my local grocery store (which is pretty big) doesn't still have it. We're not like America, the only corn thing that you can routinely find is corn starch and most manufactured foods use potato starch instead. I suspect this has to do with agricultural subsidies.

whoops, there are two dishes with this name, but i meant the cny one.this recipe is close to what my mom does, but it's basically a sweet, chewy, sticky rice cake that you can then panfry for max deliciousness

The ingredients seem to be somewhat hard to find, I'll have to go to a ethnic grocer for this one, definitely.

oh no, the tofu pudding i meant was douhua, not the one that goes with berries. uhhh, douhua is more a 'make-your-own-soy-milk-then-make-a-dessert' recipe, but you've passed on soy milk so just ignore this one???

lol, I could make douhua instead of that other one then. I could make soy milk then but I'm not interested in soy milk on its own. Would you have a recipe for douhua?

kimchi can last indefinitely in the fridge as long as you keep it under the liquid line and stir it around every once in a while. it's lactobacteria, but the sourness is desirable here so the worse that happens is you introduce different bacteria and end up growing mold

That's good to know, molds are fungi though.

[–]anand 5 points6 points ago

Here's two of my favorite dishes (wonderfully, very easy):

Palak Paneer (w/ naan/paratha/Any indian bread)

This is an indian dish consisting of spinach and little cheese cubes. Paneer might be hard to find unless at an ethnic store, but you can substitute it for a firm ricotta or extra firm tofu if you want.

Mujadara (w/ yogurt)

This is the best deliciousness/value ratio dish I know of. It's literally just onions, lentils, and rice, plus a few spices to make it taste good. But oh so good does it taste. I'm a huge fan of the yogurt, I think it really takes it to the next level.

Also, you can turn basically anything you want into a curry if you know the basics. Pretty much every curry I make starts from the same base of onions, garlic, ginger, and some spices, before I branch out with more stuff. I can guarantee you that making a curry is one of the easiest things to cook, if you want to make something like that!

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

Palak Paneer (w/ naan/paratha/Any indian bread)

This is an indian dish consisting of spinach and little cheese cubes. Paneer might be hard to find unless at an ethnic store, but you can substitute it for a firm ricotta or extra firm tofu if you want.

I actually researched making paneer on your own the last time I looked into this dish. Apparently it's laboursome but otherwise totally doable IIRC.

Have you made it with fresh spinach? I wonder what the difference might be. I've done saag bharjit a couple of times which is reasonably similar except it has no cheese cubes in it.

Mujadara (w/ yogurt)

This is the best deliciousness/value ratio dish I know of. It's literally just onions, lentils, and rice, plus a few spices to make it taste good. But oh so good does it taste. I'm a huge fan of the yogurt, I think it really takes it to the next level.

Have you got a recipe for this? Mostly curious of the kind of rice and lentils that go well with it. I'm a bit of a stickler since the purpose of this project is to let me collect recipes and plan the bulk of my shopping, cooking and diet in advance.

Also, you can turn basically anything you want into a curry if you know the basics. Pretty much every curry I make starts from the same base of onions, garlic, ginger, and some spices, before I branch out with more stuff. I can guarantee you that making a curry is one of the easiest things to cook, if you want to make something like that!

I'd totally like to make curries, but I have no idea how they work. I think I've eaten 'real' curry exactly twice and the last time I made it on my own I put way too much caraway into it (or rather ours here in the North is very aromatic and halving the amount in the recipe wasn't nearly enough).

I have this feeling that a lot of simple dishes have this "essential" core to them that you should absolutely nail and then the rest of it are things that you don't even have to pay attention to. And I don't know the core of curry!

[–]anand 1 point2 points ago

Have you made it with fresh spinach? I wonder what the difference might be. I've done saag bharjit a couple of times which is reasonably similar except it has no cheese cubes in it.

I have made it with fresh spinach! It's basically the same, more or less. I usually do frozen spinach for convenience, because then I don't have to quickly boil it to cook it, before blending it.

Have you got a recipe for this? Mostly curious of the kind of rice and lentils that go well with it. I'm a bit of a stickler since the purpose of this project is to let me collect recipes and plan the bulk of my shopping, cooking and diet in advance.

I learned to make Mujadara by scouring a bunch of random recipes online and then blending them together, so while I don't have any exact figures, I have the general method: The proportions are 1 to 1 of brown lentils to some long grain rice (go Basmati if you want to be fancier, it's really good!), and finally 2-4 onions for every cup of lentils/rice. You really can't overdo it with the onions, since they're gonna be caramelized, and they're so delicious. I made this for a bunch of people once and it was 2 cups rice, 2 cups lentils, and 6 onions. But that's a lot of food.

The method of preparation is: First, start heating up oil (olive oil if you want that flavor, otherwise some neutral oil). It should be more oil than you're used to, covering the bottom of the pot (you're cooking a lot of food). Do it in a big pot because this is where you'll end up mixing everything at the end. Then chop up all your onions (I prefer them to be in short little strips!) and toss them in, cooking on medium-low heat. You're going to be caramelizing them, so this will take a while. While you're doing the other stuff, come back to the onions and stir them, making sure none stick to the pan and burn.

Start boiling water, and wash off the lentils/make sure there aren't any stones in 'em. Cook the lentils in moderately-salted boiling water for 10-15 minutes, until they're not crunchy (they're going to be cooked more anyway). After that, drain them so they stop cooking and getting mushier. While they're cooking, wash the rice. As well, prepare the spices: if you have dry cumin, pan roast until its color darkens before grinding it. I don't really know the proportions in units, but I think it's around 2 tsp per cup rice/lentils? As well, have about half as much pepper as you add cumin, and half as much cinnamon if you want to.

By now, hopefully the onions are done caramelizing (that's the real rate-limiting step). As an optional step for garnish, take half the onions out and put them on the side. Now put the rice (uncooked) into the pot with the onions, and add the spices, and stir, cooking for ~5 minutes. After that, add the lentils, and add enough water to barely cover the rice/lentil mix (about 2.5 cups for the 1 cup lentils 1 cup rice recipe, but trust your gut). And add a bay leaf per cup lentils, and a lemon peel if you're feeling fancy. And, of course, add salt to taste.

Once that's done, remove the bay leaves/lemons. Taste it again to see if it needs more salt, and add accordingly. If you took out half the onions earlier, put them on the top of the dish for garnish. And you're done! Serve with yogurt.

Ingredient summary: 1 cup white rice, 1 cup brown lentils, 3 onions, 2 tsp cumin, 1 tsp pepper, 1 bay leaf, 1/2 tsp cinnamon, 1 lemon peel. Sorted in order of optionality.

I have this feeling that a lot of simple dishes have this "essential" core to them that you should absolutely nail and then the rest of it are things that you don't even have to pay attention to. And I don't know the core of curry!

Yeah, this is how I feel too. I only know the cores of a few types of cooking, but there's certain things that you'll notice basically every recipe starts off with. If you want to make an anything-curry, sautee an onion in some oil, add cumin, coriander, black pepper, maybe turmeric, and whatever spices you find fit (spice mixes like garam masala are good if you don't know what individual spices taste like and thus don't know if they fit), as well as garlic and/or ginger, and chilli peppers now if you want them. That's the base, and you can put anything you'd like on top!

I spent too much time writing this post, heh. I love the food though.

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

I have the general method: The proportions are 1 to 1 of brown lentils to some long grain rice (go Basmati if you want to be fancier, it's really good!)

Brown lentils aren't a thing here, but are green lentils ok? They're bigger too and I suppose red lentils go too mushy.

As well, prepare the spices: if you have dry cumin, pan roast until its color darkens before grinding it.

You're talking about this, right?

lemon peel if you're feeling fancy

oh yeeesss!

spice mixes like garam masala are good if you don't know what individual spices taste like and thus don't know if they fit

I think I'll start with this! I remember hearing that spice mixes like these as a thing started when British people wanted to eat Indian food back home and I suppose I'm kinda not that different in that regard.

I spent too much time writing this post, heh. I love the food though.

No problem, it was helpful!

[–]anand 0 points1 point ago

Green lentils work too! Just, lentils that aren't red, you got it.

And yeah, that's what cumin is. It's used in a lot in middle eastern/indian/mexican food. Good stuff! You can get it powdered or in seed form, I'd recommend powdered since it doesn't seem like you're going to use it a prodigious amount yet.

[–]hoppet🍕🍣🍛🌯🧀🍔🍜🍵🍪 3 points4 points ago

I've got lots of recipes but what are your dietary restrictions?

[–]StudentRadical27 2 points3 points ago

None. Or at least don't let them concern you!

[–]hoppet🍕🍣🍛🌯🧀🍔🍜🍵🍪 4 points5 points ago

I'm just gonna throw a bunch of suggestions out there. I've made all of these so if you want any specific advice on any of them let me know:

Learn a good pasta sauce using fresh tomatoes. Summer is a great time for them!

Clam chowder.

Chili using dried peppers... they have so much more interesting flavor than fresh imo.

Macaroni and cheese (like the homemade baked kind).

Not a meal but learning to make bread can be a great experience.

Eggplant Parmesean

Pizza w/ homemade crust (which is bread making)

Curry (not from a box).

Risotto (if you can use a short-grain high starch rice like arborio, it makes all the difference)

Pasties (aka hand pies)

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

Learn a good pasta sauce using fresh tomatoes. Summer is a great time for them!

Funny enough I think that my bravure is my tomato pasta sauce. My mother keeps gushing about it to strangers!

Clam chowder.

I'm interested but our clam situation is a bit limited. I live next to the Baltic sea which has limited but non-trivial salinity which means that both salt and fresh water creatures struggle a lot. There's hardly anything edible in a mussel!

Chili using dried peppers... they have so much more interesting flavor than fresh imo.

I grew chilies as a hobby few years ago so I disagree, but I do agree that the commercially available chilies aren't that great or go with Eastern cuisine much better and many peppers do get better when dried or smoked. Making a chili is in my plans already, it's that one American dish that I've been curious about but haven't actually done. I might use the opportunity as an excuse to order some of the typical Mexican dried chillis.

Macaroni and cheese (like the homemade baked kind).

Do you have a recipe? I have no idea what it's like.

Not a meal but learning to make bread can be a great experience.

I want to make a beautiful loaf of sourdough bread!

Eggplant Parmesean

Looks pretty interesting, what would you pair it with?

Pizza w/ homemade crust (which is bread making)

My oven makes shitty pizza, I ain't gonna try it. Besides there's an excellent pizza place right by where I live.

Curry (not from a box).

I don't really understand curry. Do you have a favorite way to do it?

Risotto (if you can use a short-grain high starch rice like arborio, it makes all the difference)

I got a load of arborio actually, to the list it shall go!

Pasties (aka hand pies)

What kind of product are you talking about? IIRC there are few kinds that go by this name.

[–]hoppet🍕🍣🍛🌯🧀🍔🍜🍵🍪 1 point2 points ago

I'm interested but our clam situation is a bit limited. I live next to the Baltic sea which has limited but non-trivial salinity which means that both salt and fresh water creatures struggle a lot. There's hardly anything edible in a mussel!

Hmm can you get them canned? That's what most people do even where I live and we're a seafood town.

I might use the opportunity as an excuse to order some of the typical Mexican dried chillis.

I recommend chipotles and/or anchos. Ancho chiles are more general-purpose as they're less smoky.

Do you have a recipe? I have no idea what it's like.

Here's a nice basic recipe. You don't have to use cheddar necessarily. Anything that'll melt decently is good. If you want some extra protein it's often conventional to add diced ham or bacon as well.

Eggplant Parmesean

Serve atop pasta. Pair with a salad. If you want something more proteiny you could do chicken instead of eggplant, or maybe seitan for a veg option?

Curry (not from a box).

Curry is a new world for me and admittedly I don't have a preferred way yet. I'll make a post when I figure it out though. In the past I've used thai curry paste + coconut milk for the curry but I want to experiment with curry powder.

What kind of product are you talking about? IIRC there are few kinds that go by this name.

Here's a fairly basic traditional recipe you can build upon and experiment with pretty easily.

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

Hmm can you get them canned? That's what most people do even where I live and we're a seafood town.

Yeah I can and the quality is basically all around, some are pretty gross and muddy and some are nice and consistency is surprisingly bad.

[–]toasthaste 2 points3 points ago

Stuffed grape leaves! I always get them when I go out to medeterranian type places and they're so dang tasty. Never made them myself though so I don't have a recipe :o

[–]StudentRadical[S] 1 point2 points ago

These are probably the most challenging. No-one grows grapes here commercially and I have no idea where to even procure them. That said I totally do enjoy them when (rarely) I see them so I might just buy canned ones actually.

[–]mustbecurious 2 points3 points ago

Tteok-bokki, bibimbap, gyoza, daifuku, dango, stuffed capsicum, palitaw uh I just realise a lot of these are rice flour based lol

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

Tteok-bokki

I'm totally at loss at what this is like. Is it like kind of a rice noodle dish (but from thicker pieces)? What's the usual serving context like?

bibimbap

Do you have a tried recipe you like? This appears to be some sort of maximally non-Nordic dish. I think that my great-grand mothers would disown me for cooking this. I'm curious though, it looks like the kind of dish that would end up in anime being delicious.

gyoza

So are they like Japanese pelmeni (sort of)?

daifuku

These are really cute but I think I'll pass. I think that I'll do Castella cake instead since I saw it in Tatami Galaxy and it seemed like FRIENDSHIP from flour, eggs, sugar and, uhh, I don't know really, the recipe wasn't really central to the plot.

dango

These look kinda fake to me tbh.

palitaw

I think I'll pass, sourcing the special rice flour is maybe too difficult and there are enough sweet foods already on my list.

[–]mustbecurious 2 points3 points ago

Tteok-bokki

I'm totally at loss at what this is like. Is it like kind of a rice noodle dish (but from thicker pieces)? What's the usual serving context like?

It's fried rice cake with spicy sauce, actually. You mentioned rice flour being too difficult in your area, so maybe this will be a pass. I usually just get the pre-made rice cakes rather than make them from scratch since I'm a lazy butt.

gyoza

So are they like Japanese pelmeni (sort of)?

Sort of, I think? Pelmeni looks like it has a really thick wrapper and Gyoza is thin enough to be fried/steamed so that it cooks in like 3-5 minutes (this is a rough estimate, since I never time anything).

bibimbap

Do you have a tried recipe you like? This appears to be some sort of maximally non-Nordic dish. I think that my great-grand mothers would disown me for cooking this. I'm curious though, it looks like the kind of dish that would end up in anime being delicious.

There's no fixed recipe for this, as it's technically steamed rice with stuff mixed (meat/fish + veggies, usually) in it and spicy red pepper sauce (Gochujang) so variations are endless. Spicy red pepper sauce uses the same base as Tteok-bokki, so if you wanna make that in the future, there's that option. If I have no pepper paste, I just mix in a lot of kimchi cause yolo.

I marinate my meat with soy sauce, sugar and garlic. You can use non-marinated meat too, it really depends on what you like. Or a can of tuna.

I'm fond of adding kimchi, bean sprouts, seaweed, mushrooms, whatever leafy veg I can find and egggggsssssss. First you cook the meat, add the veggies (my mum cooks everything separately, but if you're lazy like me, I don't think it matters since you mix them together in the end anyway).

Also toasting the bottom of the cooked rice is p good--not all, unless you're into that, but like get a cup or whatever of rice and dump it in the same pan you used to cook the meat and veg, and leave it for a bit without mixing so that part of it toasts--but I realise not a lot of people outside Asia are used to this?

Dump everything into a bowl, add the bibimbap sauce, mix and eat. (My sister likes mixing the raw egg with the rice while frying, but I prefer fried egg with a runny yolk. Or you can do both so the rice is moist + visible egg.)

Alternatively~ while cooking the rice, you can dump all of the meat while the rice is half-cooked, add the veggies and egg when the rice is nearly cooked and then sauce when the rice is done. Mix and eat. This is basically for lazy people (again, me).

[–]dudeseriouslyno 0 points1 point ago

You done couscous yet? Paella? Loubia?

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

What is loubia please teach me

[–]dudeseriouslyno 1 point2 points ago

Tomato-flavoured salvation. Turkey apparently calls it kuru fasulye. A tomato, white bean and onion stew with cumin and typically some harissa.

[–]StudentRadical[S] 0 points1 point ago

please give a reputable recipe

[–]dudeseriouslyno 0 points1 point ago

Don't know about reputable, but the way it's done at my place goes:

  • brown the sliced onions in some oil for a bit, directly in the pot
  • add tomatoes and water; alternately, a whole can of skinned tomatoes including the water
  • if using meat, add it now (don't remember which bit in particular)
  • add cumin; salt and pepper to taste
  • if using meat, leave to cook until the meat is done
  • add beans, either canned or fresh and softened
  • boil down to a soup-like consistency

Harissa is added at mealtime, to taste. You can also use tabasco sauce.