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[–]StudenRadical3dril irl 5 points6 points ago

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for some reason I follow r/Fitness on Reddit, so some information sort of leaks to me.

Just a heads up, /r/fitness is terrible, roughly as bad as /r/philosophy is for philosophy or /r/math for actually learning about math. There are decent people answering questions though, but you sort of have to separate the wheat from the chaff. It's a lot of beginners trying to help other beginners.

It seems to me that, without a few hours of studying and a working knowledge of human skeletomuscular anatomy, there's no way you can exercise without causing permanent damage to your ligaments/tendons/muscles/skeleton.

Au contraire, not exercising causes damage. And too much exercising. In between is a sweet spot. It's sort of like inverted U where benefits lie in the middle and injury in the extremes.

Anybody who's heavy into this exercising stuff, is there anything I could do to be Less Weak And Unhealthy without making me pay for it down the road?

Cardio is the single most important thing, for both not dying and laying a base for other activity. For example, the salary of lumberjacks correlated well with cardiovascular fitness but not with strength back in the 50's and I suppose it's just as useful for most heavy manual labor. Even olympic weighlifters do cardio, that's how important it is. Do at least three sessions a week, 30 minutes a piece. Add volume tops 10% a week.

What's an appropriate pace? So fast you can't sing and so slow you can still speak. This means that a certain space of your heart gets filled with blood each heart beat. This space, known as the left ventricle, pumps blood from your heart to your body. The pressure will stretch it over the time and thus it can deliver more blood and thus more oxygen with each beat, making it more efficient.

  • Walking. The trick is to go fast enough.
  • Rucking. This is underrated exercise: you can pack a meal and drinking water in too and make it long
  • Running
  • Swimming, if you have a beach nearby. Or public pool. Or whatever, depending on economics.
  • Cycling, if you have a bicycle and necessary roads.

Running, rucking and walking are all weight bearing activities, which means you can hurt your joints or tendons more easily and seriously. It's important to progress in volume (how much) before progressing in intensity (how fast) so that your tendons, bones and joints can adapt to demands. They all get fit slower than muscles.

So how to progress in volume? You can literally start running with, say, warming up for five minutes with brisk walking, then running for 30 seconds and then walking for 2 minutes and 30 seconds and repeating this cycle for 10 times. Then next time run for 40 seconds and walk for 2 minutes and 20 seconds, and so on, until you jog slowly for 30 minutes three times a week.

You can add faster intervals later, but the ratio of Low Intensity Steady State (LISS) cardio to fast training by volume should be about 80:20 to 90:10. Like, 90 minutes of slow cardio and 10 minutes of high effort stuff you can't keep up for longer than, like, minute or two, per week.

I recommend eating carbs after cardio. Your muscles store sugar in glycogen, but exercise depletes those stores, but a post exercise meal is a good chance to replenish them. If you do like 90+ minute plus session, eat before too. If you something like 4-5 hours of hiking in one go, eating trail mix or sweets during the exercise isn't bad idea. These are all performance based ideas though.

Strength /r/bodyweightfitness has a pretty nice beginner program, but you need a pull up bar for it. Pretty cheap equipment can help. You can buy gymnastics rings for not much and do your own parallettes out of LVC pipes. Push ups can be made harder with a backpack and weights. For training legs and glutes, there's sadly nothing as good as barbells though, but you can try to work to pistol squats. Training whole body three times a week works well for beginners and takes about 30 to 45 minutes per session, warm up included, in the beginning.

Some stuff you could eventually work up to: muscle ups, pistol squats, l-sits.

Maximal strength has a high correlation with muscle mass. So unless you have a BMI of, say, over 35, to keep progressing you eventually need to gain weight, which is literally just eating enough calories. Potatoes, rice and beans, ice cream, canola oil, fried chicken, cookies are all things that work about equally well; "clean eating" doesn't apply. To make sure it's muscle, train hard enough and eat 1.6 g of protein per kg of body mass per day. (If you're a vegan, bump this up a little bit.) To die later rather than sooner, eat vegetables, fruit and berries at every meal. Frozen vegetables are affordable, just steam or microwave them, add a little bit of olive oil, salt and pepper for taste and voila. Eat carbs in the morning and after workouts, at least.

Mobility and flexibility This goes well with strength training, actually. /r/flexibility has a nice beginner resources as well. I recommend being religious about your calves, hamstrings and hip flexors. These all tend to get inflexible with lots of sitting which the modern society is full of. Other stuff as needed too. Do every other day to keep progressing.

Also go to sleep soon enough that you don't need an alarm clock to wake up. Sleep + food + exercise = gains, but no-one can sell sleep so it's underrated.

This was long, hope it helps. It was easy to write though.

[–]toasthaste#1 Magic Nerd 2 points3 points ago

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woah this is good info, I never heard of rucking before. I might try that when the weather cools down a bit.

[–]StudenRadical3dril irl 3 points4 points ago

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Rucking is pretty great! I have some recommendations for it too:

  • Do it just once a week in the beginning, for a couple of months at least. Your calves, shins and feet will thank you. Also, start with just a backpack, a waterbottle and perhaps a snack.

  • I think that rucking is best done somewhere around 45-90 minutes at a time. Why? i) good preparation for hiking and walking as a tourist - no more sore feet! ii) it's more volume thus it's good for your heart (that left ventricle thing) iii) longer session make muscle cells adapt to using fat as fuel which is good since it spares both glucose and oxygen. That means you can do stuff for longer without going bonk. 90 minutes of running is pretty hardcore, but most people can walk it, so this means it's more available.

  • Progress either by walking longer, faster, adding hills to the path or increase load in the backpack. (Use a scale for the last progression method, your shoulders will thank you.) One pound at a time is enough. Use towels to fit the load so that it feel comfortable on your back. Waterbottles are convenient, since if a need arises you can just pour them empty. Sand is another cheap option.

  • Choosing the right kind of socks are important to avoid blisters. Wear ones made out of synthetic fibers that wick moisture close to the skin and wool socks as the second layer soak up the sweat. Avoid cotton, it's nothing but harm.

  • drink a cup of water before you go. Half of it about 15 minutes in advance and the rest of it the moment you step out of the door. You'll sweat it all and more.

[–]toasthaste#1 Magic Nerd 2 points3 points ago

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it definitely sounds like a sex thing though

[–]devteslau gonna eat that 1 point2 points ago

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it is

[–]1vsgo play environmental station alpha[S] 1 point2 points ago

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This is really good and very accessible and easy to read. Thank you so much! Is it okay if I post this in r/bestof? (Our bestof, not Reddit, of course.)

Like Toasthaste, I also hadn't heard of rucking before and had to google it. It defiitely seems interesting. I also didn't know sleep was important for exercise, although it makes sense considering how important it is everywhere else.

Anyways this is a really good post and I have it bookmarked!! I'm looking at the beginners resources on r/flexibility right now :)

[–]StudenRadical3dril irl 2 points3 points ago

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Yeah feel free to. No bragging - not even humblebraggin!!! - but this is just a distillation of the most important stuff I've gotten out of a half a dozen books, Strengtheory.com and the occasionally useful article. And it's just the tip of the iceberg, so to speak.

Also an addition: you can of course walk for exercise everyday if you want to. The +10% per week rule for volume is more so for the other things which are all either more repetitive, more strenuous or both. I injured myself three days after I did my first ever 60 minute jog after my first ever 30 minute one. My right ankle gave me grief even while walking. It took me a month to recover and I lost all of my hard earned running prowess. Don't be that guy. Mixing different modalities, like swimming and running, is good for injury prevention though.

[–]1vsgo play environmental station alpha[S] 1 point2 points ago

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I love swimming a lot! I'm going to have access to a pool in the apartment I'm moving into later this month so I am going to be making full use of that.

[–]StudenRadical3dril irl 2 points3 points ago

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I also didn't know sleep was important for exercise, although it makes sense considering how important it is everywhere else.

Exercise actually makes you weaker and slower. It's a stressor much like UV light, tobacco smoke, poison or angry spouse. You only get fitter because your body supercompensates in rest. It, hopefully, emerges as stronger than ever before in a way that is specific to the stressor. You tan in your back if enough UV light hit the skin on your back, gain strength in biceps if you did enough tough sets of curling and so on. Sleep is rest par none and your hormones go haywire in excess of sleep debt. Also it just feels good.

[–]hoppetmeme research associate 0 points1 point ago

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woah u must be so swole

[–]StudentRadicalI'm dril irl 0 points1 point ago

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Nah, best lift is squatting 370-ish pounds for a triple