all 5 comments

[–]toasthaste 9 points10 points ago

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Thank you for this, every article I've seen on this before was frustrating me so much!

They'd offhandedly mention "oh btw the sriracha plant is causing health problemsOH NO WHAT WILL WE DO WITHOUT COCK SAUCE EVERYONE"

[–]trimalchio 4 points5 points ago

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I think this is a lot more complicated than even this piece is really getting at...

first, the response to this sort of airborne capsaicin is pretty individual, a lot of people will adamantly say that their neighbors are lying because they don't experience it from the same air, so that sort of reaction is going to muddy any effort to do something about this.

secondly, as far as I've read, this issue doesn't really have a longstanding history and so figuring out what changed and how to correct it is going to take insight into the operations of the plant, but the adversarial nature of what's gone on already is going to make transparency difficult to achieve.

third, it's unlikely that this sort of emission has legally defined limits (and detection and enforcement are unlikely bordering on impossible) so there's very little that the residents can do to legally force this issue without first getting some serious backing from people in city government, and even then it will take a long time and a lot of lawyers to force them out, and in the mean time it's unlikely to be bearable to the people who it does affect, and to those it doesn't the media coverage will negatively affect the price of their home.

I think this issue is a prime example of a need for community based mediation instead of legally based mediation. The legal system is probably going to fail these residents even with it's threat of force and fine, and if successful, will have no other method of reprieve than force the business to leave the area. But, if the factory and the community aimed to work together from the outset things like chili cooking notices, specific shifts and times, and things like that could have led to a less oppressive outcome for both the business and the residents.

[–]trimalchio 5 points6 points ago

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Oh, and I forgot, the shortage has nothing to do with the resident's complaints, it's a health department requirement that the sauce be kept for 30 days before shipment that they're now starting to enforce.

So saying that the shortage means we shouldn't listen to the residents complaints is ridiculous and misinformed.

[–]AngryPackOfPuggles 1 point2 points ago

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Isn't part of the reason there's no "longstanding history" is that the Huy Fong Food factory in Irwindale is relatively new, and they only process the peppers during a specific time of year?

[–]trimalchio 0 points1 point ago

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Yeah, they might've done the processing for the chillies at other plants in previous years even, making it entirely possible that residents started complaining the moment they started doing it, but it seems unlikely that Huy Fong will cop to that publicly after all this...

I just looked into what's going on now and apparently Huy Fong has put up a banner outside that reads "No Tear Gas Produced Here"